Exchange Traded Funds

An Exchange Traded Fund, known as an ETF is a security that tracks an index, a commodity or a basket of assets like an index fund, but trades like a stock on an exchange. ETFs experience price changes throughout the day as they are bought and sold.

Because it trades like a stock, an ETF does not have its net asset value (NAV) calculated every day like a mutual fund does.

By owning an ETF, you get the diversification of an index fund as well as the ability to sell short, buy on margin and purchase as little as one share. Another advantage is that the expense ratios for most ETFs are lower than those of the average mutual fund. When buying and selling ETFs, you have to pay the same commission to your broker that you’d pay on any regular order.

One of the most widely known ETFs is called the Spider (SPDR), which tracks the S&P 500 index and trades under the symbol SPY.

In less than 20 years, exchange-traded funds (ETFs) have become one of the most popular investment vehicles for both institutional and individual investors. Often promoted as cheaper, and better, than mutual funds, ETFs offer low-cost diversification, trading and arbitrage options for investors. Now with over $1 trillion assets under management, new ETF launches number from several dozen to hundreds, in any particular year. ETFs are so popular that many brokerages offer free trading in a limited number of ETFs to their customers.

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